InTRventions

                                  A Therapeutic Recreation Conference


Conference Program Schedule

Longwood University’s Therapeutic Recreation

Alumni Practitioner Advisory Council

and

Virginia State Therapeutic Recreation Association (VASTRA)

invite you to attend…


“INTRVENTIONS” CONFERENCE 2019

May 20-21, 2019

Longwood University

Farmville, Virginia

Longwood University Therapeutic recreation alumni practitioner advisory  Councill


Longwood University Therapeutic  Recreation

Alumni practitioner advisory council


The Advisory Council is comprised of Longwood Therapeutic Recreation alumni. These clinicians and practitioners provide valuable input into the program such as curricula & internship selection, mentor students, assist with marketing and promotion of the program, and assist with the bi-annual conference and showcase. The council members represent a wide variety of service settings as reflected in the current membership.

Longwood TR Alumni Practitioner Advisory Council Board:

Jennifer Cava, CTRS

Bill Parker, CTRS

Curtis A. Robb, CTRS

                                   

Jennifer Vass, CTRS

Tory Rogers, CTRS

 

Sarah Sprague, CTRS 

Mariellen Combs, CTRS,

           

Erika de Witt, CTRS

Elisabeth Drake, CTRS

Jennifer Vitolo, CTRS

Sara Jarrett, CTRS

Alexis Pullin

Student Representative

Taylor Rollison

Student Representative

Longwood Faculty:

Susan Lynch, CTRS, PhD

Kirstin Whitely, CTRS, D.H.A.

Ann Bailey Yoelin, CTRS, EdD


The Mission of VASTRA is to promote the profession of Therapeutic Recreation and its professionals in the Commonwealth of Virginia. Our work is to facilitate periodic low-cost workshops/conferences to bolster continuing education and promote state and local awareness of the Therapeutic Recreation profession.

VASTRA Board:

Current Presidents:                                          Takeyra Collins, CTRS & Brie Kilmartin, CTRS

President Elect:                                                  Sara Jarrett, CTRS

Treasurer:                                                            Scott Turner, CTRS

Secretary:                                                            Diane Gressett, CTRS

Membership:                                                     Sarah Sprague, CTRS

Members at Large:                                           Ann Bailey, CTRS, Shaeron King, CTRS,

Kristen Spencer, CTRS, Rose Robinson, CTRS,

Elisabeth Drake, CTRS, Jennifer Norton, CTRS,

Anita Chinyavong, CTRS, Kirstin Whitely CTRS

Past Presidents:                                                Kari Decker, CTRS & Susan Lynch, CTRS


General Information and Conference Reminders

Registration and CEU Desk Hours:

Monday, May 20:        6:30 am – 8:30 am      Blackwell Foyer

Tuesday, May 21:        7:00 am– 8:30 am       Blackwell Foyer

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ACCOMODATIONS - We ask that individuals requiring special services and/or needs please fill out the “accessibility needs section” on the Registration form (e.g. interpreter, wheelchair transportation, special diet, etc.) Advance notice is required for these services.

ATTIRE - Casual attire is the standard recommended dress for this workshop.  Nights in Farmville may be chilly so bring a jacket.

CELL PHONES - Please silence your cell phones/pagers during all sessions you are attending out of respect for the speaker(s).

CEU’s- Continuing education units (CEU’s) are provided by ATRA and are available to registered participants for qualifying sessions.  The actual amount of CEU’s awarded is based on the number of completed educational sessions.  Please note participants must attend both parts of a two-part session to receive credit for the session. In order to obtain full credit it is not permissible to be ten minutes late or leave ten minutes early from any session.  Also, any lengthy periods of absence over ten minutes during the session may jeopardize full credit for CEU’s. Please make sure your CEU form has been signed before you leave the conference. You are able to earn a maximum of 1.2 CEU’s at the InTRventions Conference. You will receive an email or mailed “certificate” documenting your CEU’s sometime after the conference.  You will need to keep a copy of the program for this conference in case you are audited by NCTRC.

DRUGS & ALCOHOL – Individuals wishing to possess and/or consume any alcoholic beverage on campus property MUST have prior written permission from the University and ensure that one is 21 years of age or older (additional policies govern the use & consumption of alcohol on campus). The University has a “ZERO TOLERANCE DRUG POLICY.” Use of illicit substances will constitute grounds for immediate removal from University property and criminal prosecution.

INTERNET – Currently, our conference participants can register for free wi-fi internet in all academic and public University spaces by connecting to the “LancerNet Visitor” network.

PARKING – Parking is available in designated areas only. Participants parking in non-designated areas are subject to fines and/or towing for violation of this policy. Special parking requests should be submitted no more than one month prior to the event, will be granted on a case-by-case basis, and are subject to approval. (See Campus Map for location of parking and meeting facilities)

Parking is in the following areas: Vine Street, Stubbs Lot, Race Street

PETS – For reasons of health, sanitation and public safety, no pets of any kind are allowed in University facilities (except guide dogs or other service animals).

SMOKING POLICY – The University prohibits smoking on campus at all times and in all University facilities except in outdoor areas that are specifically identified as “Designated Smoking Areas.” Any person who continues to smoke in an area designated as a non-smoking area or does not discard of cigarette butts properly after having been asked to refrain may be subject to civil penalty of no more than twenty-five (25) dollars.

SOCIAL – Monday Night:

Contact Information – if you have any questions about the program, registration, housing, or accommodations, please contact:

 Dr. Susan Lynch (434) 395-2542 or

Scott Turner <vastra@cox.net>


Conference at a Glance

Monday, May 20

 (.7 CEUS)

9:00 – 10:00 AM

Session 1: Channeling Your Inner Super Hero: Power Strategies for Recreation Therapists

Room: Blackwell A

Session 2: Get Fit Where You Sit! An  Intro to Lakshmi Voelker Chair Yoga

Room: Virginia

Session 3: An Attitude of Gratitude: Contributing to a Positive TR setting (2 part session)

Part 1

Room: Blackwell C

10:10-11:10 AM

Session 4: Richmond’s VA Poly-Trauma Center of Care

Room: Virginia

Session 5: Interventions that Matter: Meeting the Needs of Those We Serve

Room: Blackwell A

Session 6: An Attitude of Gratitude: Contributing to a Positive TR setting (2 part session)

Part 2

Room: Blackwell C

11:10-11:30

SNACK

11:30-12:30PM

Session 7: The Power of Reinforcement

Room: Blackwell C

Session 8: NCTRC Certification Process

Room: Prince Edward

Session 9: Enhancing Senior Wellness & Professional Competence through TR Service Learning

Room: Virginia

12:30 – 1:00 PM

BOXED LUNCH

Blackwell A and B

1:00-2:00 PM

Session 10: Keynote 

The Future of Recreation Therapy: To Infinity and Beyond

Room: Blackwell A and B

2:10-3:10 PM

Session 11: Equine Assisted Learning for Youth in a Behavioral Health Setting

Room: Prince Edward

Session 12: The Practicality of Ethics in Recreational Therapy

Room: Blackwell C

Session 13: Swimmers Take Your Mark…Benefits of Aquatic Exercise for People with Multiple Sclerosis

Room: Virginia

3:20-4:20 PM

Session 14: Emotional Intelligence: Knowing Self to Understand Others in Your TR Practice (2 part session)

Part 1

Room: Blackwell A

Session 15: Meeting the Needs of Clients with Seizure Disorders in Recreational Therapy Practice

Room: Virginia

Session 16: Snozelen Therapy for Alzheimer’s, dementia, and End of Life (2 part session)

Part 1

Room: Blackwell C

4:30-5:30 PM

Session 17: Emotional Intelligence: Knowing Self to Understand Others in Your TR Practice (2 part session)

Part 2

Room: Blackwell A

Session 18: Creating a 24/7 Curriculum: Every Interaction is a Therapeutic One

Room: Virginia

Session 19: Snozelen Therapy for Alzheimer’s, dementia, and End of Life (2 part session)

Part 2

Room: Blackwell C

Tuesday, May 21 (.5 CEUS)

8:00-9:00 AM

Session 20: Mindfulness Based Practices and

De-escalation

Room: Blackwell A

Session 21: : Easy, Engaging and Energizing Music Activities for Individuals Living with Dementia in a TR Setting (no prior musical experience required)

Room: Virginia

Session 22: Stroke 2019: Your Role

Room: Blackwell C

9:10-10:10 AM

Session 23: Walking a Mile in Their Shoes: Navigating through Alzheimer’s Disease and Challenging Behaviors

Room: Virginia

Session 24: Connecting with the CTRS Community

Room: Blackwell A

Session 25: How can a CTRS Fit into Culture Change?

Room: Blackwell C

10:20-11:20 AM

Session 26: : Going All In: The Benefits of Inclusion Adventure

Room: Virginia

Session 27: NCTRC Recertification and Areas of Specialization: Continuing Professional Competence

Room: Blackwell A

Session 28: Taking the Next Step (2 part session)

Part 1

Room: Blackwell C

11:30-12:30 PM

Session 29: Ensuring Dignity in TR Service Provision for Individuals with Dementia in Long Term care

Room: Blackwell A

Session 30: Beating out Stress through Rhythm

 Room: Virginia

Session 31: : Taking the Next Step (2 part session)

Part 2

Room: Blackwell C

12:45-1:30

Catered Lunch

1:45-2:45 PM

Session 33: Endnote

Evidence of Value: TR Interventions and Individuals with Disabilities

Room: Lee Grand Dining Room


InTRventions FULL PROGRAM

All conference sessions are located in Blackwell Hall (Endnote in Lee Grand Dining Hall)

Monday, May 20

9:00 am – 10:00 am            Breakout Sessions

Session 1 (Blackwell A)

Channeling Your Inner Super Hero: Power Strategies for Recreation Therapists

Power is the ability to influence the behavior of others. Despite being a key ingredient to success, the thought of using one's power often makes people feel uncomfortable. In this session, participants will learn about the seven bases of power and reflect on how they utilize power in their everyday lives. While analyzing personal strengths and weaknesses, participants will create an action plan to use and build their power more effectively.  Don't wait any longer; come channel your inner Super Hero and learn how to become a more successful recreation therapist!

Session Objectives:

1.             Differentiate between personal and positional bases of power.                

2.             Identify at least 3 ways they currently use power in the workplace and/or everyday lives.

3.             Identify at least 3 strategies to increase personal power.

Speakers:               Ann Bailey Yoelin, EdD, CTRS, Longwood University

                                Sara Jarrett, CTRS, The Virginia Home             

Session 2 (Virginia Room)

Get Fit Where you Sit! An Intro to Lakshmi Voelker Chair Yoga

Do you have residents, clients, or participants who can’t get down on the floor due to age, weight, disability, or inflexibility or who use a wheelchair? By adapting traditional yoga poses to a chair, you can bring the accessible benefits of yoga to those unable to take part in even a gentle class. Lakshmi Voelker Chair Yoga was developed to bring adaptive fitness and exercise programs to those who could not benefit from traditional physical activities. In this session, LVC Yoga Teacher, Kristen Spencer will demonstrate 3 yoga poses that have been adapted for the chair and that can be used with almost any population and age group. Get Fit Where You Sit!

Session Objectives:

1.             Identify the benefits of Chair Yoga.  

2.             Identify how to become certified in LV Chair Yoga.      

3.             Demonstrate at least 3 different Chair Yoga poses that can be adapted. 

Speaker:                 Kristen Spencer, CTRS, CIFT, LVCYT, Therapeutic Recreation Services of the Roanoke Valley

Session 3 (Blackwell C)

An Attitude of Gratitude: Contributing to a Positive TR Setting - Part 1

(Note: You must attend BOTH parts 1 and 2 to earn CEUs)

How do you express gratitude for a job well done?  As recreation therapists, we have the skills to empower and encourage.  Not only do we do this with our clients, but we can with ourselves and the different disciplines with which we work.  One way to help build a healthy workplace is by showing appreciation.  It's essential in today's workplace for everyone to feel valued and to understand how this can directly affect the clients with whom we work.  By exploring the book, "The 5 Languages of Appreciation in the Workplace" by Gary Chapman and Paul White, we'll examine the ways individuals communicate appreciation differently, how people vary in how they perceive appreciation, and how we can contribute towards a more positive and effective workplace for CTRSs, staff, interns and volunteers.

Session Objectives:

1.             Participants will learn the importance of feeling valued and how this helps to create an effective and positive therapeutic recreation setting for clients             

2.             Participants will identify the 5 languages of appreciation in the workplace and actions that are realistic options for recreation therapists that will communicate appreciation within each language.                  

3.             Participants will develop an action plan they can professionally administer within the TR setting on how they'll encourage and support themselves, staff, interns and volunteers.               

Speakers:               Mariellen Mory Combs, CTRS, CRC, Loudoun County Public Schools

                                Rose Robinson, CTRS, ServiceSource, Inc.        

10:10 am – 11:10 am          Breakout Sessions

Session 4 (Virginia Room)

Richmond’s VA Poly-Trauma Center Care

This session will describe the three different areas of Poly-Trauma system of Care, an overview of diagnoses treated, what treatment modalities are used to progress a patient from one unit-to-the-next, and how the patients are re-integrated back into the community.

Session Objectives:

1.             Identify basic difference between various types of brain injury.

2.             How cognitive and behavioral approaches are used to progress a patient.

3.             Identify community modalities used to increase mobility, emotional stability and cognition in the community.

               

Speakers:               Jennifer Vass, CTRS, Hunter Holmes McGuire Veteran Medical Center     

                                 Freda Sergi, CTRS, Hunter Holmes McGuire Veteran Medical Center

                                Curtis A. Robb, CTRS, Hunter Holmes McGuire Veteran Medical Center

Session 5 (Blackwell A)

Interventions That Matter: Meeting the Needs of Those We Serve

Have you ever heard the quote from Henry Ford that says “If you always do what you’ve always done, you’ll always get what you’ve always got.” It's easy to get stuck in the rut of what we've always done.  Let's talk about how to get out of that rut and create new and creative community based programs to serve the people that matter most in our job, our patrons!  We will discuss the importance of creating innovative programs that include varying diagnosis and how to get the most out of our assessment tools.

Session Objectives:

1.             Practitioners will identify the pro's and con's to having programs that include multiple diagnosis.    

2.             Therapists will be able to identify at least 4 interventions and measurable goals that could serve individuals with varying diagnosis.

3.             Therapists will have a better understanding on how to get the most appropriate information from the assessment process to ensure success in specialized and inclusion TR programs.

Speaker:                 Melody Beck, CTRS, Chesapeake Parks, Recreation and Tourism

Session 6 (Blackwell C)

An Attitude of Gratitude: Contributing to a Positive TR Setting - Part 2

(Note: You must attend BOTH parts 1 and 2 to earn CEUs)

How do you express gratitude for a job well done?  As recreation therapists, we have the skills to empower and encourage.  Not only do we do this with our clients, but we can with ourselves and the different disciplines with which we work.  One way to help build a healthy workplace is by showing appreciation.  It's essential in today's workplace for everyone to feel valued and to understand how this can directly affect the clients with whom we work.  By exploring the book, "The 5 Languages of Appreciation in the Workplace" by Gary Chapman and Paul White, we'll examine the ways individuals communicate appreciation differently, how people vary in how they perceive appreciation, and how we can contribute towards a more positive and effective workplace for CTRSs, staff, interns and volunteers.  

Session Objectives:

1.             Participants will learn the importance of feeling valued and how this helps to create an effective and positive therapeutic recreation setting for clients.            

2.             Participants will identify the 5 languages of appreciation in the workplace and actions that are realistic options forrecreation therapists that will communicate appreciation within each language.  

3.             Participants will develop an action plan they can professionally administer within the TR setting on how they'll encourage                and support themselves, staff, interns and volunteers. 

Speakers:               Mariellen Combs, CTRS, Loundon County Public Schools

                                Rose Robinson, CTRS, ServiceSource, Inc.

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11:10am – 11:30am                 Snack Break

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11:30 am – 12:30 pm          Breakout Sessions

Session 7 (Blackwell C)

The Power of Reinforcement

Participants will learn about the power of reinforcement to improve socially significant behaviors and decrease maladaptive behaviors. Session participants will learn the differences of positive reinforcement vs negative reinforcement and positive punishment vs negative punishment. Furthermore, how these techniques can be used together to support the individual's success in daily living and skill acquisition. Session participants will also be able to discriminate the similarities and differences of preferences and reinforcers for the individual.

Session Objectives:

1.             Participants will be able to discuss the differences and techniques of reinforcement vs punishment (positive vs. negative)               

2.             Participants will be able to assess preferences of individuals and describe/determine preferences vs reinforcer of the individual.             

3.             Participants will be able to create meaningful reinforcement schedules in Therapeutic Recreation programming to support the individual's improvement/ maintenance of quality of life.   

Speaker:                 Sarah Sprague, CTRS, RBT, Family Insight P.C.               

                               

Session 8 (Prince Edward Room)

NCTRC Internship Guidelines: Ensuring a Quality Internship

The internship experience is an integral part of preparing the future professional for practice as a successful Certified Therapeutic Recreation Specialist. The internship supervisor is the link between education and practice for the new professional. In order to best prepare the student, it is necessary that all individuals involved in the internship experience be aware of the current standards for the internship experience. This session provides an in depth coverage of the NCTRC Internship Standards. The information is geared to internship supervisors and will discuss how to successfully develop an internship experience. It will include the requirements necessary to complete an internship experience and requirements to maintain certification.

Session Objectives:

1.             Describe at least three of NCTRC's Internship Standards.           

2.             Apply the ten Job Task areas of the NCTRC National Job Analysis Study to the development of internships

3.             Name the three major requirements that are reviewed when applying for NCTRC certification

Speakers:               Anne Richards, LRT/CTRS, National Council for Therapeutic Recreation Certification

                               Noelle Molloy, MSEd, CTRS, National Council for Therapeutic Recreation Certification           

Session 9 (Virginia Room)

Enhancing Senior Wellness and Professional Competence through TR Service Learning

In this session, approaches to adopting and facilitating a university-driven RT-focused intergenerational service learning program, in collaboration with a community-based long-term care facility partner, will be discussed.  Strategies for program development and implementation will be presented using the Old Dominion University/Beth Shalom Village senior wellness program as a model with an overview of how such programs support the professional development of undergraduate therapeutic recreation students and enhance quality of life for participants.  Simultaneous program outcomes, including improved physical and social health in older adults and increased professional competence in RT service delivery will be examined.  Facilitators will promote the exploration of modifying the model program for application in participants’ individual settings through professional support and resources. 

Session Objectives:

1.             Identify a minimum of three benefits of intergenerational service learning programs for older adults in long-term care settings. 

2.              Identify a minimum of three benefits of intergenerational service learning programs for Recreational Therapy professionals in training.

3.             Develop an agency-specific plan for implementing the model program in their own setting.

Speakers:               Shelly Beaver, MS, CTRS, Old Dominion University

                                 Joshua Bennett, CTRS, Beth Shalom Village   

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12:30 pm – 2:00 pm     Boxed Lunch & Keynote Address (Blackwell A and B)

Session 10:        The Future of Recreation Therapy: To Infinity and Beyond

The field of recreation therapy/therapeutic recreation (RT/TR) began as a recognized profession just over 70 years ago. Through these decades, RT/TR has grown and evolved through significant accomplishments (research, credentialing, membership, JCAHO, marketing, etc.) and is now recognized within the healthcare arena as a legitimate and effective therapy. This progress, however, is far from over as the new millennium brings new challenges and goals. This session will describe where we came from as a field, discuss where we stand now as a legitimate profession, and outline the work that lies ahead to facilitate RT/TR's growth, development, and continued strengthening of occupational prestige. Practitioners and students will be guided in not only what challenges lie ahead, but also as to how they can negotiate these obstacles as teachers, counselors, trainers, mentors, advocates, leaders, and professional citizens to further enhance the field of RT/TR now and to infinity and beyond.

Session Objectives:

1.             State at least five (5) accomplishments of RT/TR field over the last 70 years.         

2.             Identify at least five (5) critical issues that exist today regarding RT/TR.

3.             Identify at least (5) individual techniques they can use to address/resolve the issues in their own settings.     

Speaker:                 Leandra A. Bedini, PhD, LRT, CTRS

                                Professor and Director of Therapeutic Recreation

                                University of North Carolina Greensboro        

2:10 pm – 3:10 pm             Breakout Sessions

Session 11 (Prince Edward Room)

Equine Assisted Learning for Youth in a Behavioral Health Setting

Session will focus on what equine assisted learning is and how it is different from hippotherapy as well as how Recreational Therapists can provide experiential learning related to improving challenges associated with behavioral health diagnoses (including depression, anxiety, relational issues, attachment disorders and more). This writer will identify how to develop an equine assisted learning program and how to implement programming as an intervention for children and adolescents in a behavioral health setting. Connections between the behavioral health diagnosis, treatment goals and program-specific goals will be investigated and discussed to provide support of this beneficial intervention.

 

Session Objectives:

1.             Identify the importance of experiential learning for youth in a behavioral health setting. 

2.             Identify 3 ways equine assisted learning is beneficial for youth in behavioral health settings.

3.             Develop 3 goals that an individual can be working to complete during the implementation of equine assisted learning.

Speaker:                 Allyson Hagan, MS, CTRS, The Barry Robinson Center  

                               

Session 12 (Blackwell C)

The Practicality of Ethics in Recreational Therapy

This session will briefly highlight the historical journey of ethics within our profession, followed by an introduction and in-depth examination of the contents of Guidelines for the Ethical Practice of Recreational Therapy.  Foundational knowledge of the ATRA Code of Ethics will be reviewed and one Principle will be featured, showing how each Principle is described in the text in terms of its structure, process and outcome criteria.  Ethical decision-making models will be illustrated and a description of how this text may be used by students, educators, practitioners and administrators as well as useful appendices will be shown and discussed. Emphasis throughout will focus on professional behaviors and attitudes as related to the advancement of our profession

Session Objectives:

1.             Verbally identify the structure, process and outcome criteria for at least one ethical Principle (FKW).             

2.             Verbally identify the steps a CTRS should take when implementing an ethical decision-making model (FKW).

3.             Verbally state how Guidelines for the Ethical Practice of Recreational Therapy would be beneficial in their practice or to others related to the field of recreational therapy (ADV).

Speaker:                 Wayne Pollock, PhD, CTRS, FDRT, Virginia Wesleyan University 

Session 13 (Virginia Room)

Swimmers Take Your Mark… Benefits of Aquatic Exercise for People with Multiple Sclerosis

Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is an unpredictable, often disabling disease of the central nervous system that disrupts the flow of information within the brain, and between the brain and body, which affects more than 2.3 million people worldwide. Studies of people living with multiple sclerosis have shown that exercise can help with fatigue and depression, improve strength, and result in increased participation in social activities. The unique qualities of water provide exceptional benefits to people with MS. Water helps people with MS move in ways they may not be able to on land. This session will introduce practitioners to a basic background of what multiple sclerosis is, as well as the benefits of aquatic exercise for people with MS.

Session Objectives:

1.             Communicate the basic definition of MS.       

2.             Communicate at least 2 benefits of aquatic exercise appropriate for people with MS.

3.             Communicate at least 3 different modifications/adaptations to aquatic exercise to better serve participants.

Speaker:                 Erika S. de Witt, CTRS, YMCA             

                                     

3:20 pm – 4:20 pm             Breakout Sessions

Session 14 (Blackwell A)

Emotional Intelligence: Knowing Self to Understand Others in Your TR Practice – Part 1

(Note: You must attend BOTH parts 1 and 2 to earn CEUs)

Emotional intelligence embraces a set of mental skills that enable you to know and control your own emotions and to recognize and effectively respond to the emotional states of your clients and professionals you work with in your agency. You will learn what your "EI" quotient is and present tools to increase your ability to deal with others in your TR service delivery.

Session Objectives:

1.             Identify what emotional intelligence (EI) is and how it can affect the way you work with your clients and other professionals in the workplace.                

2.             Identify your own "EI" Quotient.

3.             Identify 3 ways to increase your "EI" quotient by managing your emotions.

Speakers:               Susan Lynch, PhD, CTRS Longwood University

                                Elisabeth Drake, VersAbility Resources, Inc.   

Session 15 (Virginia Room)

Meeting the needs of clients with seizure disorders in Recreational Therapy practice

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (2015), approximately 3.4 million people in the United States reported having active epilepsy.  This statistic suggests we, as Recreational Therapy providers, are guaranteed to serve individuals experiencing seizures (if we are not already). The purpose of this dynamic and interactive session is to educate RT professionals about seizure disorders to improve their professional competence when serving this population. Session topics will include the varying presentations of seizure disorders and how to best meet the needs of these clients.  Special attention will be given to dispelling the deeply rooted stigma toward seizures and providing appropriate and effective strategies to support clients experiencing seizures.

Session Objectives:

1.             Identify personal biases and misconceptions regarding epilepsy and seizure disorders.

2.             Accurately describe the history of seizure disorders and related prejudice, stigma, and discrimination.

3.             Recognize, identify, and describe the varying presentations of seizures observed in RT practice.

4.             Identify and implement appropriate and effective therapeutic strategies and RT interventions to meet the needs of clients with varying seizure disorders.

5.             Advocate for individuals with seizure disorders within the RT, healthcare, and local communities.

Speakers:               Susan Hundley, BS, MBA, Old Dominion University

                Shelly Beaver, MS, CTRS, Old Dominion University

               

Session 16 (Blackwell C)

Snoezelen Therapy for Alzheimer's, Dementia, and End of Life - Part 1

(Note: you must attend both parts 1 and 2 to earn CEUs)

What are the origins, benefits, properties, implementation strategies, and evaluations of Snoezelen Therapy? The participants will experience all components of Snoezelen Therapy with opportunities for hands-on interaction during session. Real time data and case studies of Snoezelen in action will be shared. Information on how you can have Snoezelen Therapy in your agency.

Session Objectives:

1.             Understand and articulate Snoezelen Therapy to their superiors, team members, and clients.          

2.             Acknowledge resources available to create your own Snoezelen Room or Cart

3.             A working knowledge of evidence based practices with Snoezelen Therapy and its documentation

Speakers:               Jennifer Cava, CTRS, The Gardens at Warwick Forest

                                Carie DeWeerd, CTRS, The Gardens at Warwick Forest

4:30 pm – 5:30 pm             Breakout Sessions

Session 17 (Blackwell A)

Emotional Intelligence: Knowing Self to Understand Others in Your TR Practice – Part 2

(Note: You must attend BOTH parts 1 and 2 to earn CEUs)

Emotional intelligence embraces a set of mental skills that enable you to know and control your own emotions and to recognize and effectively respond to the emotional states of your clients and professionals you work with in your agency. We will learn what your "EI" quotient is and present tools to increase your ability to deal with others in your TR service delivery.

Session Objectives:

1.             Identify what emotional intelligence (EI) is and how it can affect the way you work with your clients and other professionals in the workplace.

2.             Identify your own "EI" Quotient.

3.             Identify 3 ways to increase your "EI" quotient by managing your emotions.

Speaker:                 Susan Lynch, PhD, CTRS Longwood University

                                Elisabeth Drake, VersAbility Resources, Inc.   

               

Session 18 (Virginia Room)

Creating a 24/7 Curriculum: Every Interaction is a Therapeutic One

Our facility saw a need to create a cohesive structure in order to make every interaction a therapeutic one. The curriculum addresses scheduling, community partnerships, families, and values. Committees have addressed common language and goals centered on a cohesive approach to treatment. We are collaborating between departments to address needs and define intentions. In this session I will discuss the evaluation, team approach, training, structure, community involvement, and reevaluation of the curriculum.

Session Objectives:

1.             Participants will deepen understanding the benefits of a cohesive approach to treatment

2.             Participants will explore the strengths of Recreation Therapy in a cohesive structure as well as strengths of allied professions and community groups

3.             Participants will be able to identify at least two components presented that is applicable to their setting

Speaker:                 Elizabeth “Liz” Creasman, CTRS, UMFS-Child and Family Healing Center  

Session 19 (Blackwell C)

Snoezelen Therapy for Alzheimer's, Dementia, and End of Life - Part 2

(Note: You must attend BOTH parts 1 and 2 to earn CEUs)

What are the origins, benefits, properties, implementation strategies, and evaluations of Snoezelen Therapy? The participants will experience all components of Snoezelen Therapy with opportunities for hands-on interaction during session. Real time data and case studies of Snoezelen in action will be shared. Information on how you can have Snoezelen Therapy in your agency.

Session Objectives:

1.             Understand and articulate Snoezelen Therapy to their superiors, team members, and clients

2.             Acknowledge resources available to create your own Snoezelen Room or Cart

3.             A working knowledge of evidence based practices with Snoezelen Therapy and its documentation

Speakers:               Jennifer Cava, CTRS, The Gardens at Warwick Forest

                                Carie DeWeerd, CTRS, The Gardens at Warwick Forest

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Third Street Brewery Evening Social – 6:00 pm-9:00 pm

Join us at – soda & pizza provided & Brewery beers available for purchase.

Feel free to bring your favorite game along too. We can’t wait to socialize and recreate with you!

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Tuesday, May 21

8:00 am – 9:00 am             Breakout Sessions

Session 20 (Blackwell A)

Mindfulness Based Practices and De-escalation

Recreation therapists often have a positive rapport with clients which is the strongest tool for de-escalation. We are often aware of allostatic load and the escalation process. I will provide information on the benefits of yoga and mindfulness based practices to decrease effects of allostatic load and increase ability to regulate emotions. This session will explore mindfulness based practices and de-escalation techniques that can be taught in sessions in order to utilize in escalated times. Description of techniques will include assessing client needs and abilities.

Session Objectives:

1.             Identify benefits of yoga and mindfulness based practices for population served.

2.             Deepen an understanding of allostatic load and emotional regulation.

3.             Learn at least 3 new techniques for de-escalation and emotional regulation for population served.

Speakers:               Elizabeth “Liz” Creasman, CTRS, UMFS-Child and Family Healing Center  

               

Session 21 (Virginia Room)

Easy, Engaging and Energizing Music Activities for Individuals living with Dementia (no prior musical experience required)   

Learn easy music activities to stimulate and energize older adults living with cognitive brain change in a group setting (no prior musical experience is required).  An overview of dementia will be covered to illustrate the areas of the brain impacted through the course of brain change (and why music is an effective activity). The music activities will incorporate movement, dancing, toe tapping, clapping, singing and listening to create an enjoyable, uplifting and rewarding experience for the participants.  We also will experience adaptation techniques to the highlight the physical, mental, emotional and communication abilities of the participants.  A discussion on safety considerations, session planning, environment settings, and logistics will be shared to create successful, meaningful and enjoyable group experiences for the participants.

Session Objectives:

1.             Demonstrate 3 connection and movement activities using music to stimulate and energize individuals living with brain change (i.e. dementia).      

2.             Illustrate 3 adaption techniques to highlight the physical, mental, emotional and communication abilities of the participants. 

3.             Identify 3 safety considerations, session location (space) considerations, preparing, communicating, logistics when planning sessions for participants living with brain change.        

Speaker:                 Becky Watson, MBA, Board Certified Music Therapist  

Session 22 (Blackwell C)

Stroke 2019: Your Role

This session will educate healthcare professionals about stroke and current trends in healthcare. Additionally, the session will encourage interdisciplinary teamwork for survivors of stroke in particular due to the high prevalence of the diagnosis. This session will discuss stoke and clinical lingo as well as what nurses need from recreational therapists.

Session Objectives:

1.             Maintain knowledge of current trends including activity examples and volunteer opportunities.      

2.             Develop appropriate and efficient interventions plans for stroke survivors.

3.             Develop collaborative services

Speakers:               Allese Scott, CTRS, St. Joseph’s Villa

                                Robin Scott, Bon Secours Health System         

9:10 am – 10:10 am            Breakout Sessions

Session 23 (Virginia Room)

Walking a Mile in Their Shoes: Navigating through Alzheimer's disease and Challenging Behaviors

Overview of Alzheimer's disease and dementia including causes, diagnosis and progression. Programming recommendations and best practices to be implemented by Therapeutic Recreation professionals while working with individuals diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease or dementia as well as tips and tricks to managing challenging behaviors.

Session Objectives:

1.             Have an understanding of Alzheimer's disease and dementia including causes, diagnosis and progression of the disease.               

2.             Learn new programming recommendations and best practices when working with individuals with Alzheimer's disease or dementia.              

3.             Gain knowledge on challenging behaviors related to Alzheimer's disease and dementia including common triggers and de-escalation techniques.

Speakers:               Casey Halstead, CTRS, CDP, Harmony at Roanoke – Pheasant Ridge Memory Center           

Session 24 (Blackwell A)

Connecting with the CTRS Community

Working together, we all can achieve more. This session will help professionals understand the benefits of actively participating in professional organizations and continuing to grow as a Certified Therapeutic Recreation Specialist.  Topics will include networking, maintaining CEU's, NCTRC specialization areas of recognitions, and the big Five-Year Recertification. Bring your business cards to share with other attendees, and learn how you can help our profession continue to thrive. A great session for new CTRS's or those new to VASTRA.

Session Objectives:

1.             State three benefits of actively participating in professional organizations             

2.             State two professional organization available to CTRS's to participate in.

3.             Establish three new professional contacts within TR    

Speakers:               Kari Decker. MS, CTRS, Therapeutic Recreation Services of the Roanoke Valley     

Session 25 (Blackwell C)

How can a CTRS Fit into Culture Change?

This session will review the changes in the way healthcare is administered and the recommendations from CMS.  The participants will learn how to adapt to the changes their facilities are making on how we approach services in long-term care and in the inpatient settings.  Participants will learn about the culture change process and how the CTRS can be a part of the new vision for the facility. 

Session Objectives:

1.             Participants will be able to define culture change.

2.             Participants will be able to identify 3 strategies a CTRS can implement during the culture change process.

3.             Participants will be able to describe the role of a CTRS in the culture change process.

Speakers:               Brianna Kilmartin, CTRS, VCU Health

                                Jennifer Norton, CTRS, Hermitage Richmond 

10:20 am – 11:20 am          Breakout Sessions

Session 26 (Virginia Room) The Benefits of Inclusive Adventure.

About %15 of people worldwide live with a disability.  That's about 1 out of 7 people. 

Without improving the world's accessibility, we do a disservice to the disabled community.  Those living with these struggles might be limited to living up to their full potential.  This session will discuss benefits associated with inclusion, from a disability and a community point of view.

Session Objectives:

1.             Select modifications for recreation activities.

2.             Evaluate changes in functioning of the persons served.

3.             Address needs and advocate for the rights of disability community.

Speakers:               Shepard Roeper, Beyond Boundaries               

                    Kyle Burnette, Beyond Boundaries                   

Session 27 (Blackwell A)

NCTRC Recertification and Areas of Specialization: Continuing Professional Competence

This session provides an in depth coverage of recertification standards and requirements for the areas of specialization. Continuing education, professional experience, and re-examination will be described in detail. Utilization of the 2014 NCTRC National Job Analysis Study in relation to recertification requirements will be discussed.

Session Objectives:

1.             Define the NCTRC CTRS recertification standards including the two components, interpretive guidelines, necessary hours required for recertification and the requirements for the areas of specialization. 

2.             Apply the ten Job Tasks and the six Knowledge Areas of the 2014 National Job Analysis Study to the recertification process

3.             Restate the two methods of the NCTRC recertification review process.

Speaker:                 Anne Richards, LRT/CTRS, National Council for Therapeutic Recreation Certification

                                Noelle Molloy, MSEd, CTRS, National Council for Therapeutic Recreation Certification

Session 28 (Blackwell C)

Taking the Next Step – Part 1

(Note: You must attend BOTH parts 1 and 2 to earn CEUs)

Are you ready to supervise or manage staff? This session participants will learn some techniques for taking the next professional step.  How to become the most qualified person for that promotion, how your previous experiences have prepared you for your next step, and how to gain the confidence to apply for that dream job.  There are many different ways to be your best CTRS.

Session Objectives:

1.             State three things they can do at their current job to prepare for a promotion

2.             State three places where therapeutic recreation positions can be found

3.             State thee techniques for feeling calm and confident before an interview

Speaker:                 Kari Decker, MS, CTRS, Therapeutic Recreation Services of the Roanoke Valley      

11:30 am – 12:30 pm          Breakout Sessions

Session 29 (Blackwell A)

Ensuring Dignity in TR Service Provision for Individuals with Dementia in Long Term Care

This session will review barriers to dignity and provide suggestions about how to increase awareness in practice by advocating for the rights of persons served, specifically in LTC, through intentional modeling.  The issues surrounding advocacy are complex necessitating a heightening of awareness by TR specialists, family members and care providers alike.  Attention will be given to identifying patterns of interaction that support human dignity along with undesirable patterns of interaction that demean others.  Methods for increasing awareness of desirable interactive patterns will include role playing, analysis of case studies, and small group discussion.

Session Objectives:

1.             Understand the barriers to living with dignity for individuals with dementia in LTC.              

2.             Identify patterns of interaction that support or detract from the dignity of individuals with dementia.

3.             Evaluate strategies for modeling dignity to family members and care providers during therapeutic activities for individuals with dementia in LTC.

Speakers:               Haley Wenos, CTRS, CDP, Brookdale Senior Living Solutions

                                Jeanne Wenos, PED, James Madison University           

Session 30 (Virginia Room)

The Power of Drumming to Strengthen Immune System and Decrease Burnout, an Evidence Based Approach

               This workshop will feature evidence-based HealthRHYTHMS group empowerment drumming

               program, developed after leading neurologist and mind-body researcher Dr. Barry Bittman, MD led a

                   renowned research team in the first biological study on the effects of group drumming in 2000. Dr.

               Bittman's Peer-reviewed scientific research studies have proven their use reduces depression,

               enhances self-esteem, improves communication, promotes team-building, increases socialization

               and builds camaraderie.

Session Objectives:

1.             Identify 3 burnout recovery strategies through drumming

2.             Identify 3-5 research articles on benefits of group empowerment drumming in the health care industry

3.             Experience 3 self-care strategies and create an implementation plan

Speaker:                 Becky Watson, MBA, Board Certified Music Therapist  

Session 31 (Blackwell C)

Taking the Next Step – Part 2

(Note: You must attend BOTH parts 1 and 2 to earn CEUs)

Are you ready to supervise or manage staff? This session participants will learn some techniques for taking the next professional step.  How to become the most qualified person for that promotion, how your previous experiences have prepared you for your next step, and how to gain the confidence to apply for that dream job.  There are many different ways to be your best CTRS.

Session Objectives:

1.             State three things they can do at their current job to prepare for a promotion

2.             State three places where therapeutic recreation positions can be found

3.             State thee techniques for feeling calm and confident before an interview

Speaker:                 Kari Decker, MS, CTRS, Therapeutic Recreation Services of the Roanoke Valley

*************************************************************************************

12:45 – 2:45   Catered Lunch & Endnote Address: Lee Grand Dining Room

Session 32

Evidence of Value: Therapeutic Recreation Interventions and Individuals with Disabilities

It is imperative that therapeutic recreation specialists provide evidence based services due to the need for accountability and reducing funds to the ever changing status in healthcare.  In order to utilize particular services that have been proven to be of value to our clients in our TR service, the initial step is to teach our future practitioners how to research best practices.  In the fall of 2018, Longwood University seniors enrolled in a major’s research class, were guided through the process of finding evidence for specific diagnosis and interventions.  This session is the product of that research. The faculty will present the need and process for this approach.  Four research groups of students will discuss their findings.

Session Objectives:

1.             Identify the need for evidence based research.

2.             Identify the process of researching evidence based practices.

3.             Identify 5 examples of evidence based practices/interventions

Speakers:               Susan Lynch, PhD, CTRS, Professor, Longwood University

                                Kirstin Whitely, D.H.A., CTRS, Assistant Professor, Longwood University

Longwood University Students: Morgan Scearce, Emily Martin, Alexis Pullin, Maya El-Jor, Casey LeMaster and Ashton Bishop


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